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Take Your Pick
 
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Middle Caicos, Turks and Caicos
My Favorite on T&C
Mudjin Harbor - Gorgeous turquoise waters crash against the majestic limestone cliffs that dominate Mudjin Harbor and depending on the time of year, this entire three mile long section of wonderful can be your own private beach. This portion of Middle Caicos is certainly the most beautiful area of Turks and Caicos. Along the beach are caves and shelters cut into the cliffs that provide a natural break from the tropical sun. Admittedly, the surf can get a little rough in this area and the rocks are a tad sharp, but on a calm days you can float on the warm water for hours.
 
Middle Caicos, Turks and Caicos
Largest Cave in the Caribbean
Conch Bar Caves National Park - Covering an area over 200 acres and snaking underground for over 15 miles, are Middle Caicos' own Conch Bar Caves. This live cave system (live because it is still growing and because it has a bunch of Buffy Flower Bats flying around) is the largest Cave in the Caribbean. The caves were once used as a sacred sanctuary by the Lucayan Indians and in the 1800s farmed for bat guano. A tour of the cave is an adventure. With everyone carrying a flashlight, the "cave guide" will escort you through the caverns pointing out features like the Christmas Room, the Nine Brothers, the Five Sisters, the Bat Room and more. It is a little slippery and there isn't a formal pathway, lighting or handrails, so care is required when spelunking.
 
Middle Caicos, Turks and Caicos
Free Cave Tour
Indian Cave - Just off the main road and to the west of the village of Conch Bar, is the large single room cavern named Indian Cave. Indian Cave was once inhabited by the native aboriginal Lucayan Indians over 1000 years ago (they were wiped out by the Spanish in the early 1500s). Excavations conducted through the years have revealed ancient Indian pottery and bones of now extinct animals. When visiting, you won't need a flashlight; the ceiling has several "skylights" making it easy to look around. There isn't an entrance fee either, so come back as often as you like.
 
Middle Caicos, Turks and Caicos
Middle Caicos
Turks and Caicos - 299 islands and nearly 40,000 residents make up what we know as Turks and Caicos. There are eight primary Caicos Islands, West Caicos, Providenciales, Pine Cay, North Caicos, Middle Caicos, East Caicos, Parrot Cay and Ambergris Cay - and two primary Turks islands, Grand Turk and Salt Cay. T&C is a somewhat independent British overseas country (recent political corruption has increased Britain's involvement). The economy is heavily subsidized by tourism, and with waters like the ones in the photo, it's easy to see why.
 
North Caicos, Turks and Caicos
Flamingo Pond
Flamingo Pond - A large salt pond on North Caicos attracts dozens of migratory birds such as the Great Blue Herons, Terns, and Egrets, but the namesake of "Flamingo Pond" is of course the pink Flamingo. Flamingos can come in a variety of colors including, pink, white or orange and it all depends on what they eat. These beautiful greater flamingos eat a lot of brine shrimp, which is broken down into a pink pigment that is deposited in their feathers. The pond is quite a distance from the viewing area (and there is no way to get closer) so bring a pair of binoculars or a nice telephoto lens for maximum viewing pleasure.
 
North Caicos, Turks and Caicos
Wades Green Plantation
Wades Green - Wade Stubbs was granted 860 acres of land on North Caicos in 1789 by Britain's King George III as compensation for his losses during the American Revolution. Stubbs grew "Wades Green" to over 3,000 acres of land and owned nearly 400 slaves at his death in 1822. The ruins of Wades Green today are one of the best historical sites on Turks and Caicos. Buildings include the Great House, an overseers house, slave quarters and several storage buildings. Admission to the site is only $5, but finding the TCI National Trust office and the site is somewhat tricky. It's probably best to call ahead and find a guide for an escorted tour.
 
Providenciales, Turks and Caicos
Manning the Guns
Cheshire Hall - In the middle of the downtown area of Providenciales, Turks and Caicos is a hidden treasure, the Cheshire Hall Ruins. Built in the early 1800s, the site includes the remains of a cotton gin, Great House, hand dug well, and of course a cannon with a sock monkey. Cheshire Hall is a former cotton plantation owned by Thomas Stubbs (brother of Wade Stubbs, the owner of "Wade's Green" on North Caicos). The hurricane of 1812, drought and soil exhaustion put an end to the plantation just 30 years after it was created. If you can pry yourself from your beach chair, and find the place (it's a well hidden treasure), you'll see some nice Turks and Caicos history.
 
Providenciales, Turks and Caicos
Sally not Jerry
Caicos Conch Farm - The Caicos Conch Farm is a commercial operation that raises conch from the egg mass stage to mature adults - a process that takes 5-7 years. At any one time, two or three million of these giant snail-like creatures are crawling around the facility. Thirty minute guided tours wind through the facility where you will see baby conch ages 6 months to several years old. There are also tanks with filled with fish grown for harvesting and rescued turtles (they are returned to the sea after rehabilitation). At the tours conclusion you will meet Sally and Jerry, two friendly conchs - and you will be able to tell them apart.
 
Providenciales, Turks and Caicos
Hanging out at The Hole
The Hole - While driving around and exploring the island of Providenciales, why not search for "The Hole". The Hole is a natural limestone sink hole measuring roughly 40 feet across and 80 feet deep that once was an underground cavern. At the bottom of its crumbling rock walls is a small pool of water that can be used as a swimming hole, but to my monkey eyes it looked a little stagnant. Not really sure how anyone could get down there without falling or jumping in - and that would be a death sentence. In all seriousness, this is probably only a 10 minutes stop, but fun to check out.
 
Providenciales, Turks and Caicos
Chalk Sound National Park
Chalk Sound National Park - It's tough to describe the water color of Chalk Sound National Park, possibly electric blue mixed with iridescent turquoise and fresh indigo. Or if you've ever seen a glacier lake, that's very close. No matter what, the five square mile bay outlined by a slender peninsula is pretty. The gorgeous waters are dotted with tiny islands, all of which are home to dozens of species of birds, marine life and plants. A good way to see the park is by rental car or moped - there is no admission fee and there are a few places to stop and take photos. Unfortunately some of the best views are blocked by private residences. So the best way to see it is by kayak.
 
Providenciales, Turks and Caicos
Grace Bay
Grace Bay - If you're staying on Providenciales (Provo), there is really only one area you should look at and that's Grace Bay. Nearly all of the island's hotels and condos are built on this five mile strip of white sand beach and some of the best restaurants and shopping are located here too. Follow the link below to find the hotel you're interested in, there are some really fancy ones to choose from.
 
Providenciales, Turks and Caicos
Inter-Island Travel
TCI Ferry Service - Inevitably, if you stay on Providenciales long enough, you are going to want to check out the other islands of Turks and Caicos. The best way to do that is by ferry, unless you have unlimited cash for air travel, then you should fly. For the rest of us, the TCI Ferry Service connects Provo to North Caicos, South Caicos and Grand Turk. The ferry ride from Provo to North Caicos across the choppy waters of the Atlantic only takes about 25 minutes. Then from North Caicos you can hire a taxi to haul you around this island and Middle Caicos. South Caicos and Grand Turk are quite a bit further and the schedule less frequent, but reachable by ferry.
 
Providenciales, Turks and Caicos
Da Monkey at Da Conch Shack
Da Conch Shack - Just like in the movie "Forrest Gump" where Bubba is talking about all the foods he liked made from shrimp, Da Conch Shack and Rum Bar has nearly that many made from conch. Cracked Conch, Conch Ceviche, Conch Chowder, Conch Fritters, Coconut Conch Stew and more grace the menu. There is even a drink called the "Conch Knocker". At first glance, Da Conch Shack may look a little run down, but the food is fantastic and the open-air restaurant is located right on the water. So pull up a picnic table, enjoy some Reggae music and enjoy some tasty conch.